Iceland Growing New Forests for First Time in 1,000 Years – Distance Learning

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Introduce students to the magic of the seemingly cold, yet vibrant country of Iceland. Through a National Geographic video (5:22), your class will examine how science and nature intertwine. The video looks at the impact of human activity, mainly deforestation, and how these activities contribute to …

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Description

Introduce students to the magic of the seemingly cold, yet vibrant country of Iceland. Through a National Geographic video (5:22), your class will examine how science and nature intertwine. The video looks at the impact of human activity, mainly deforestation, and how these activities contribute to climate change on a global scale. As a result, the world’s landscapes are suffering. Iceland has decided to take steps to rectify this situation and is currently planting three million trees per year in the country. Is it working? Time will tell.

2 Video guides included in this resource!

Format:

– Quick share fillable PDFs for the paperless classroom or easy printing

– Short answer and essay questions

– Answer keys included

– Video is hyperlinked into both guides for quick student access

Suggested Teaching Methods:

1. Pair students to watch and answer questions together.

2. Watch the video as a class, then assign questions as a follow-up activity.

3. Assign each student a question(s) to answer and share.

4. Use as a lesson plan for a substitute teacher.

5. Utilize as an extra credit or homework activity for a related topic lesson.

Student Outcomes:

1. Identify the effects of human interaction (climate change, deforestation, grazing, etc.) on the natural landscape.

2. Examine the ongoing results of efforts to restore and bolster Iceland’s forests.

3. Research the Siberian Larch tree and its survivability in the modern climate.

Topics Covered:

1. Deforestation

2. Grazing and soil erosion

3. Climate change impact on vegetation

4. The use of exotic tree species as a preference over native species

5. Seedling and genetic breeding

“Within a few centuries, almost all of the island’s trees were slashed and burned to make room for farming. This rapid deforestation has resulted in massive soil erosion that puts the island at risk for desertification. Today, the Icelandic Forest Service has taken on the mammoth task of bringing back the woodlands. With the help of forestry societies and forest farmers, Iceland’s trees are slowly beginning to make a comeback. Watch this short film by Euforgen to learn more about how their efforts are working to benefit Iceland’s economy and ecology through forestry. “

Teaching Time

Around 30 minutes with discussion

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✅Tip:

Students using Chromebooks should download the free Chrome app DocHub.

It saves their work in the PDF as they work and has great sharing options including Google Classroom

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